Candidate:
Michigan Supreme Court

Elizabeth Clement
Nonpartisan



Elizabeth Clement  

Elizabeth Clement is a Michigan Supreme Court justice who is running for her first full term. She was appointed to the court by Republican Gov. Rick Snyder in November 2017 to replace former Justice Joan Larsen, who had been named to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. These are nonpartisan races but candidates are nominated to run by each political party. Clement was nominated by the Michigan Republican Party.

Her nomination was controversial among some Republicans because of her decision to join the majority in a 4-3 ruling to allow an anti-gerrymandering proposal to be placed on the Nov. 6 ballot. She also voted with the majority in a 4-3 ruling that upheld the right of Ann Arbor and Clio public schools to ban guns in their districts.

On her campaign website, Clement is described as a rule-of-law judge who “respects the separation of powers and understands that the role of the judiciary is limited to interpreting and applying the Constitution and laws as written.”

Prior to her appointment to the Michigan Supreme Court, Clement served as chief legal counsel for Republican Gov. Rick Snyder. She held other jobs within Snyder's administration, including cabinet secretary, deputy chief of staff and deputy legal counsel. In 2010, Clement served as legal counsel for Republican Michael Bishop, the state Senate Majority Leader. From 2006-2010 she was policy advisor in the state Senate Majority Policy Office.

Clement worked in private practice for her own law firm from 2002-2006, focusing on family law, adoption, probate, estate planning, and criminal law. Before that she was a legislative aide to State Senate Majority Floor Leader Mike Rogers.

Clement received both her undergraduate degree and law degree from Michigan State University.

She lives in East Lansing with her husband, Thomas Clement, and their four children. Thomas Clement is general counsel to the Michigan Supreme Court.

Mary Doster, treasurer of the nonprofit Michigan Redistricting Resource Institute, is serving as treasurer for Clement's campaign. Doster also is campaign treasurer for the other Republican Supreme Court candidate, Kurtis Wilder.

Click here for a description of the Michigan Supreme Court as well as links to other judicial candidate profiles.

Elizabeth Clement:  In The News

Meet 2018 Michigan Supreme Court candidate Justice Elizabeth Clement Michigan Radio, Oct. 31, 2018

Michigan’s Republican black-sheep justice is winning some unlikely alliesBridge Magazine, Oct. 16, 2018

6 compete for 2 seats on Michigan Supreme CourtMLive, Oct. 16, 2018

Michigan Supreme Court Race Has 6 Candidates for 2 Seats U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 14, 2018

Our endorsement for Supreme Court: Clement and CavanaghDetroit News, Oct. 11, 2018

Finley: Put end to justice bullying Detroit News, Sept. 29, 2018

Democrats give boost to GOP state Supreme Court candidate shunned by her partyDetroit Metro Times, Sept. 28, 2018

Michigan justice faced 'bullying' over redistricting planDetroit News, Sept. 24, 2018

Amid jeers, Michigan Republicans select a supreme court justice who strayedBridge Magazine, Aug. 25, 2018

Clement criticized for redistricting decision, still earns Supreme Court nominationMLive, Aug. 25, 2018

Will Michigan Republicans take down Justice Clement? If so, here’s howBridge Magazine, Aug. 23, 2018

This Republican Judge Just Took a Principled Stand. Good Luck in the Next ElectionEsquire, Aug. 2, 2018

Michigan GOP could drop support for judge over gerrymandering vote Detroit Free Press, Aug. 1, 2018

Republican Supreme Court justices have ties to Michigan gerrymandering groupBridge Magazine, July 31, 2018

Schools can ban guns on school property, Michigan Supreme Court rules MLive, July 27, 2018

GOP justices face tough choice in gerrymandering caseDetroit Free Press, July 11, 2018

Snyder taps staffer for Mich. Supreme CourtDetroit News, Nov. 17, 2017

Snyder expected to name Chief Legal Counsel Beth Clement to Michigan Supreme Court Detroit Free Press, Nov. 15, 2017