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Who's Running For Washtenaw County Offices?

The Nov. 8 ballot includes several offices for Washtenaw County elected officials. Depending on where you live within Ann Arbor, you'll be voting for Washtenaw County commissioner in either District 2, 7, 8 or 9. (Click here to get a sample ballot to check what district you're in.) 

All residents of Washtenaw County also will be voting for sheriff, prosecuting attorney, clerk/register of deeds, treasurer and water resources commissioner. Except for the sheriff's race, only the incumbents are on the ballot for these other countywide offices. HOWEVER, there is an official write-in candidate for the prosecuting attorney's race, though write-in candidates don't appear on the ballot. (The deadline to file as an official write-in candidate is Oct. 28, but those names won't appear on the ballot.)

Below you'll find descriptions of all these offices as well as candidate profiles for these races. You can check out our Voter Basics page for more details about the voting process. If you need to see a SAMPLE BALLOTclick here.


ABOUT THE WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS:

The Washtenaw County board of commissioners is a group of nine elected officials, each one representing a district in Washtenaw County. Ann Arbor is represented on the county board by three main districts – Districts 7, 8 & 9 – as well as a small part of District 2, which includes a piece of northwest Ann Arbor. 

County commissioners are elected for a two-year term. Their main responsibilities are to oversee and approve the county’s budget, to hire and supervise the county administrator, and to make appointments to county boards and commissions, including the quasi-independent Washtenaw County Road Commission. The job of county commissioner is part-time, earning a base of $15,911 annually. Officers of the board earn more. Chairs of the board, ways & means committee and working session earn $18,911, and the board vice chair is paid $16,911.


WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: DISTRICT 2

District 2 covers north and northeast portions of Washtenaw County, including a small part of northern Ann Arbor and Barton Hills. It also includes the townships of Salem, Northfield and Webster, most of Ann Arbor Township and Superior Township, and a small part of the city of Dexter. (Click to see map.)

There is one candidate from each major political party running for Washtenaw County commissioner in District 2: Michelle Deatrick (Democrat) and Dan Smith (Republican), the incumbent. Click on each candidate's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: DISTRICT 7

District 7 covers the east, northeast and southeast portion of Ann Arbor. (Click to see map.) The incumbent, Democrat Andy LaBarre, is the only candidate on the Nov. 8 ballot. He was unchallenged in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary and is no Republican candidate. Click on LaBarre's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: DISTRICT 8

District 8 covers central and south-central Ann Arbor. (Click to see map.) Democrat Jason Morgan is the only candidate on the Nov. 8 ballot. He was unchallenged in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary and there is no Republican candidate. (The District 8 incumbent, Democrat Yousef Rabhi, is running for state representative in District 53 rather than seeking re-election to the county board.) Click on Morgan's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: DISTRICT 9

District 9 covers the west, northwest and southwest sides of Ann Arbor. (Click to see map.)

Democrat Conan Smith held this seat from January 2005 until he resigned effective Aug. 20, 2016. His resignation was prompted by conflict-of-interest issues over his decision to apply for the job of director of Washtenaw County's Office of Community & Economic Development (OCED). His resignation does not affect his candidacy for election on Nov. 8, however – and he subsequently removed himself from consideration as an applicant for the OCED job.

Conan Smith is the only candidate on the Nov. 8 ballot. He was unchallenged in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary and there is no Republican candidate. The deadline for official write-in candidates is Oct. 28, but those candidates won't appear on the ballot. So far, two write-in candidates are running for this seat: Jen Eyer and Jeff Hayner. (Elizabeth Janovic and Jeremy Peters also filed, but subsequently withdrew.)

Click on each candidate's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY SHERIFF

The county sheriff is a full-time position elected countywide, with a salary of $122,869. The sheriff’s office oversees the county’s police services (sheriff’s deputies and road patrols), jail and community corrections, dispatch, and emergency services. It has an annual budget of about $50 million and employs roughly 400 people.

There is one candidate from each major political party running for sheriff on Nov. 8: Incumbent Jerry Clayton (Democrat) and Ken Magee (Republican). Click on each candidate's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY PROSECUTING ATTORNEY

The county prosecuting attorney is a full-time position elected countywide, with a salary of $122,869. The prosecuting attorney's office is responsible for all felonies and misdemeanors charged under state law, as well as juvenile delinquency proceedings, terminations of parental rights for abuse and neglect of children and mental health commitments. The office's civil division establishes paternity and child support obligations, and a special unit is devoted to the prosecution of domestic violence and criminal sexual conduct.

Democrat Brian Mackie, the incumbent, is the only candidate on the Nov. 8 ballot. No Republican is running for this office. However, D'Real Graham has filed as an official write-in candidate – though as a write-in, his name won't appear on the ballot. Click on each candidate's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY CLERK – REGISTER OF DEEDS

The county clerk/register of deeds is a full-time position elected countywide, with a salary of $104,755. The register of deeds office manages property records for the county, while the clerk’s office maintains all vital records – deaths, births and marriages – as well as oversees elections and manages weapons permits. The office also maintains records for the county board of commissioners and the 22nd Circuit Court. The clerk serves on the three-member Washtenaw County election commission, along with the county treasurer and 22nd Circuit Court judge.

There is only one candidate for clerk/register of deeds on the Nov. 8 ballot: Democrat Larry Kestenbaum, who is the incumbent. No Republican candidate is running for this office. Click on Kestenbaum's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY TREASURER

The county treasurer is a full-time position elected countywide, with a salary of $104,755. The treasurer is authorized by the Michigan Constitution and state law to serve as the county's banker and investment officer. The treasurer's main responsibilities are to safeguard public funds and to collect and account for the revenue used to operate programs for county residents. The treasurer also serves on the county's election commission.

There is only one candidate for county treasurer on the Nov. 8 ballot: Democrat Catherine McClary, who is the incumbent. No Republican candidate is running for this office. Click on McClary's photo to learn more.

 

WASHTENAW COUNTY WATER RESOURCES COMMISSIONER

The county water resources commissioner is a full-time position elected countywide, with a salary of $104,755. The office of the water resources commissioner oversees a range of programs and services, including design, construction & maintenance of more than 500 county drains; emergency flood response; maintenance of seven court-set lake levels; financing drain projects through sale of notes and bonds; soil erosion and sedimentation control; public works programs; and watershed plan development and implementation. The office also conducts public education programs, including the Community Partners for Clean Streams, RiverSafe Homes, and Rain Garden program. The water resources commissioner also serves on the Washtenaw County parks & recreation commission.

There is only one candidate for county water resources commissioner on the Nov. 8 ballot: Democrat Evan Pratt, who is the incumbent. No Republican candidate is running for this office. Click on Pratt's photo to learn more.